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Reviews

Survival Box

What do you do when you live in an age of renewed Trumpian nuclear anxiety and wish to express the doomed future of the youth therein?  If you’re William Scoular, you make Survival Box, a film so navel-gazing in its execution that, by the end of its runtime, it can only be described as an answer to a question no one asked.

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The Stone Speakers

One of the best things about moviegoing is watching a rising star come into their own element.  Up-and-coming actors are always praised for this, but we don’t shed enough light on indie filmmakers who finally find the right vehicle for them.

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Sword of Trust

In the freewheeling indie Sword of Trust, director Lynn Shelton has given her four talented principals the go-ahead to improvise when needed.  And with their background in comedy, the audience can clearly see these actors are game.  Shelton (who wrote this movie with former SNL staff writer Mike O’Brien) is no stranger to a loose narrative, as seen in 2009’s hilarious buddy comedy Hump Day.  But, this time, her reigns are a little too loose.

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The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Family history is a dependable theme for filmmakers to explore.  The Last Black Man in San Francisco, however, is more about what it means to preserve that lineage.  In their breakout feature film debut, filmmaker Joe Talbot and actor Jimmie Fails unpack an observational story that’s related to that, based on elements of Fails’ real-life experiences.

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Acquainted

Acquainted is the type of indie that wants to say something profound about romance.  Little does writer/director Natty Zavitz know, dozens of other movies have beat him to the punch.

Reviews

We

By: Trevor Chartrand Director Mani Nasry has made a very personal film with We, and it’s certainly commendable, brave even, to see how transparent this young director has been in making the film – I suspect we’re getting a deep look into his mind, his personal philosophies and hardships.  Nasry and his crew deserve a lot of respect for what their film is trying to do – however the finished product is far from flawless.

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The Miseducation of Cameron Post

As people grow up, ideas are suggested to them from various sources to help craft their life in a certain way.  However with The Miseducation of Cameron Post, co-writer/director Desiree Akhavan makes an argument about the search for personal individuality which is not only liberating, but absolutely valid.  Adapting Emily M. Danforth’s novel of the same name, Akhavan shows audiences that no matter what customs or beliefs are enforced onto another person, their voice and personality…

Reviews

Prodigals

By: Trevor Chartrand Michelle Ouellet’s Prodigals depicts a feeling as much as a narrative.  Based on a stage play of the same name, the film is about a group of 20-somethings reflecting on their lives, and coming to terms with the emptiness staring back at them.  While it may sound bleak and unsettling, the film isn’t without a few shimmering rays of hope.