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Filmmaking

Reviews

Lux Æterna

I’ll be reviewing Gaspar Noé’s Vortex very soon, and I wanted to use the filmmaker’s latest short Lux Æterna as a gateway to his latest feature.  I’m a fan of Noé’s polarizing work from what I’ve seen (Irreversible, Enter The Void), but his latest projects utilize a split-screen technique I haven’t seen him play around with before.  As a provocateur, the writer/director has been know to explore and experiment with “gratuitous filmmaking”.  It’s overkill for…

Reviews

The Comeback Trail

For as morbid as it is, I had a really good time watching The Comeback Trail, a dark comedy about a scheming film producer banking on the “accidental” death of his leading star.  Think Bowfinger or The Producers with more slapstick and cynicism.

Reviews

Spice It Up

Spice It Up does something really special that I hope will translate to general audiences.  It rips on practically everything that has to do with making a movie, including those brave enough to take on such a task.  It even doubles down on its niche by teasing student filmmakers and the amateur qualities they have yet to grow out of.  Spice It Up isn’t mean, but it’s self-aware enough to shoot off some well-meaning friendly…

Reviews

The Other Side of the Wind

You’ve heard of a movie “spinning its wheels”, but have you seen a movie that is simply “spinning”?  That’s what Orson Welles’ recently recovered The Other Side of the Wind makes its audience feel like – it’s an evening on a sociable, abrasive lazy suzy with Hollywood elites admiring each other just as often as they’re jumping at another’s throat.

Reviews

King Cohen

There is a police parade walking down the street.  Dozens of men in uniform are walking in formation, surrounded by revelers.  Suddenly, Andy Kaufman pulls out a gun and shoots someone down.  He is subdued and shot.  With his last breath, he says “God told me to.”  I have only seen one Larry Cohen film, and yet it managed to contain one scene which placed itself directly into my brain.  Cohen has spent decades writing…

Reviews

Filmworker

Stanley Kubrick was a peculiar anomaly.  He was a world famous filmmaker with a classic catalogue, yet he lived an elusive life.  Allegedly, it was rare to be granted access into Kubrick’s personal life, and it was more rare to find someone who would be willing to put themselves that close to him considering Kubrick’s infamous reputation.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Sook-Yin Lee

Sook-Yin Lee is currently mystifying Toronto movie goers with her long-awaited return to feature-length filmmaking.  Octavio is Dead! gradually reels us in with a dream-like allure as we observe Tyler (Sarah Gadon) rediscover herself through the death of her absent father (Raoul Max Trujillo).  From there, Lee strings her audience on a winding narrative that consistently maintains a personal intimacy throughout its run.