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Reviews

The Lighthouse

After wowing audiences with his feature-length debut The Witch, writer/director Robert Eggers takes a big swing with The Lighthouse – a film with more specifications and fewer actors.  His latest film connected with many (our own Shahbaz Khayambashi loved it at TIFF), but it didn’t work for me.  I can appreciate the dedication of Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe (which translates into their memorable performances), but the actors are wasted on a movie that’s too muddled…

Reviews

A Hidden Life

Terrence Malick is a fascinating oddity of cinema.  After making two highly acclaimed features in the 1970s, he disappeared for two decades before returning sporadically until the 2010s, when he suddenly completed six features at a rapid-fire pace.  This sudden burst of productivity did have a negative effect however.  When a new Malick film was reviewed every handful of years, his visionary filmmaking style was exciting.  However, getting a new one every year makes the…

Reviews

I See You

Adam Randall’s thriller I See You is so good, it hurts.  Seriously though, because I’m biting my tongue.  I want to gush about this fantastic movie so much, but talking about it in detail would be a disservice.  The film dishes out so many surprises and they all stick a miraculous landing.

Reviews

Line of Descent

Are you still thirsty for crime movies after soaking in The Irishman?  You might want to give Line of Descent a shot.  In no way is Line of Descent in the same league as Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece, but it’s a solid pick for people looking for to be entertained by lighter popcorn fare after watching Netflix’s consequential epic.

Reviews

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open

Walking home on a dreary day in Vancouver, Áila (Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers) finds herself in the middle of an altercation between a surly man and a meek Indigenous woman.  The woman, Rosie (Violet Nelson), has been roughed up.  With instinctual grace and with Rosie’s permission, Áila steps in and separates Rosie from this argument, and invites the stranger into her house for safety and comfort.

Reviews

Brotherhood

By: Trevor Chartrand Based on a true story, Brotherhood is a harrowing tale of survival that recounts the tragedy beset upon a boy’s summer camp in Balsam Lake, Ontario in 1926.  On the night of July 20, thirteen boys and two camp counsellors set out to cross the lake in a canoe to gather food and supplies for the camp.  They encountered high winds that capsized the boat, leaving them floating in the cold water…

Reviews

Marriage Story

By: Jessica Goddard At the Marriage Story screening I attended, a complimentary packet of tissues was waiting in the cup holder of each seat in the theatre.  Quite the statement.  So when the movie opens with both leading characters reading the lists of things they like about one another in front of a mediator, you know this will be a wrenching watch. 

Reviews

Midway

By: Jessica Goddard Full disclosure: I am bad at watching war movies.  I watch war movies out of some (likely misdirected) sense of duty – if actual human beings lived these horrors, I should be able to stomach cinematic recreations of them, is my thinking.  But, I find it very hard to watch people die (which I’ve chosen to attribute to a smug overabundance of empathy) even if it’s only a performance.  For this reason,…