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Wylie Writes

Reviews

Getting to the Nutcracker

By: Addison Wylie For those looking for a seasonal flick, Getting to the Nutcracker may hit the spot. Serene Meshel-Dillman’s documentary about the conception of The Nutcracker at Los Angeles’ Marat Daukayev School of Ballet is a eloquent film.  If you’re a theatre enthusiast and are already humming Tchaikovsky, Getting to the Nutcracker will have you grinning throughout its entirety. Dillman documents each phase as best as possible leading up to the big show (which…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Queen of Blood

Queen of Blood (DIR. Chris Alexander) By: Addison Wylie Two years ago, Fangoria’s editor-in-chief Chris Alexander rocked the Blood in the Snow Film Festival with his filmmaking debut Blood For Irina.  He called it an “experience” and said the best way to view the film is by locking yourself in with it.  He was absolutely right.  His atmospheric silent film was a masterpiece and a sensory whirlwind; utilizing ominous music and smouldering cinematography to pull the movie goer…

Reviews

Heartbeat

By: Addison Wylie Heartbeat is a nice party guest that’s too shy to say anything.  After a while, you’re a little annoyed that they haven’t involved themselves more.  And when they finally speak up, they fish for compliments in a coy manner but also try and convince you that they have low self esteem.  By the end of the night, cleaning up crushed red cups and mopping up spilled brew is more fun than trying…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Serpent’s Lullaby & Berkshire County

As movie goers prepare for the season’s holiday offerings, horror fans buckle up for a round of Canadian talent at this year’s Blood in the Snow Film Festival. The festival, founded by Kelly Michael Stewart, features the cream of the genre crop.  Blood in the Snow’s selections range from unsettling slow burns to the visually grotesque.  It’s a competently passionate showcase that gives indie filmmakers a fantastic opportunity to premiere their work, and hands audiences a rare…

Reviews

Point and Shoot

By: Gesilayefa Azorbo The first question Point and Shoot director Marshall Curry asks his subject off-camera is, “So how did a guy from Baltimore end up fighting in the Libyan revolution?”  This is likely the question on the minds of every audience member who sits down to watch this film. And, it’s this question that the film itself repeatedly returns to examine through a mix of personal interviews and exposition via first-person video footage shot over…

Reviews

Dumb and Dumber To

By: Addison Wylie Misunderstandings are a common thread in movies directed by the Farrelly Brothers.  With Dumb and Dumber To, misunderstandings have exceeded past plot and the dimwitted characters. Since Dumb and Dumber To has the filmmakers returning to the past, let’s take a look at their flawed filmography. The 90’s were very kind towards the brothers with Dumb and Dumber, KIngpin, and There’s Something About Mary scoring mightily with audiences.  In 2003, matters started…

Reviews

Maleficent

By: Addison Wylie “I think I liked that movie…” As soon as Maleficent’s credits rolled, those were the lukewarm words that scrolled across my brain like a news ticker reporting a traffic jam at three in the morning.  Robert Stromberg’s reimagining of one of Disney’s villains had me entertained and interested throughout.  But, do modern day revisions have to be this heavy?  This is more of a question directed towards Disney and screenwriter Linda Woolverton. When…

Reviews

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

By: Addison Wylie Anyone can review The Amazing Spider-Man 2.  It’s a popular property that accumulates truckloads of moolah, merchandise, and movie goers.  It’s an easy film to seek out and watch, and afterwards, the consensus is measured on whether that audience was thrilled enough.  Marc Webb’s sequel is popcorn entertainment that either comes through or doesn’t.  There’s no middle ground. Instead of using this space to write about how much I was thrilled during…

Reviews

Palo Alto

By: Addison Wylie It’s dangerous for a film like Palo Alto to have a character openly confess that movies nowadays are pointless.  You expect that character to look straight into the camera and sigh. I was left sighing while I watched Gia Coppola’s feature film debut.  I was also skeptically furrowing my eyebrows and skewing expressions in my stupor.  Palo Alto could easily be resold as a workout video for voice actors. Coppola has taken…

Reviews

It’s Good to Be the King: Blazing Saddles

By: Addison Wylie This November and December, TIFF pays tribute to one of comedy’s most influential talents.  Mel Brooks: It’s Good to Be the King gives movie goers the chance to relive Brooks’ hilarious masterpieces through pristine prints. TIFF kicks off the retrospective on November 15 with screenings of The Producers (5:00 p.m. at the TIFF Bell Lightbox) and Young Frankenstein (7:30 p.m. at the TIFF Bell Lightbox).  However, I’m going to focus on the…