Wylie Writes

Reviews

Video Games: The Movie

By: Addison Wylie Gamers are a smart brand of people and consumers.  As much as Video Games: The Movie believes in that notion, filmmaker Jeremy Snead’s patronizing presentation suggests otherwise. Many can pitch the argument that gazing into a monitor and playing video games wastes you away, but the hypervigilance that is developing amongst nimble younger generations has older fans impressed.  Those veterans are also admiring how the industry has brought players together, and how…

Reviews

Honeymoon

By: Addison Wylie Bea and Paul are that cute couple you wish to never go out to dinner with.  They’re not terrible people or arrogant, they’re just overwhelmingly in love.  They’re those newlyweds who have cute nicknames for each other and always have an enamoured smile plastered on.  On the car ride home, you’re significant other would turn to you and say, “They were nice. We should be more like them.” Maybe that’s why I…

Reviews

Metro Manila

By: Addison Wylie Metro Manila took me on quite the emotional rollercoaster.  At first, I was skeptical.  By the end, I was clutching the edge of my seat and anticipating filmmaker Sean Ellis’ next move. Let’s start at the beginning.  Those initial weary sensations were drawn from how Ellis envisioned impoverished areas of the Philippines.  Without a moment’s notice, the filmmaker hurls us into the damp streets alongside the Ramirez family.  Times are tougher than…

Reviews

Heaven Is for Real

By: Addison Wylie Heaven Is for Real is – so far – my favourite recent faith-based flick in a year full of religion centric movies.  It’s mild-mannered and shoots for attainable goals, which makes Randall Wallace’s movie all the more amiable.  Another major plus is how there’s no preachy hidden agenda detailing the motivations of the movie.  Religion serves as a prominent theme in Heaven Is for Real, but its only to add depth to…

Reviews

The One I Love

By: Addison Wylie Every moviegoing year has a movie like The One I Love.  That one movie where everyone who sees it unanimously and silently agrees to keep quiet about it. It’s a neat decision to witness.  It shows that the average audience still loves a challenge and still loves to keep a secret, hoping that their friends can one day see the movie and join the club. Just as many who have seen and…

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2014: Into the Drink

By: Addison Wylie For a while, Atlantic. was the most relaxed I had felt at this year’s festival.  Incredibly shot sequences of Fettah windsurfing across the infinite drink eased me into a trance.  Its angelic score cradling the audience is the final nuance Atlantic. has that completely sends us into adoration with these moments of Jan-Willem van Ewijk’s tranquil tale. Alas, Atlantic. follows a bothersome and oddly common theme at this year’s TIFF.  Atlantic. eventually drifts…

Reviews

Bears

By: Addison Wylie I’ve had to alter my evaluating criteria for DisneyNature.  It’s clear the sub-studio has no interest returning to the quality of earlier docs like Earth and Oceans anytime soon.  Instead, families receive a cutesy story set to live action B-roll of animals in their natural habitats. As someone who appreciates the importance of these wildlife documentaries, I find it tough to embrace this type of manufactured product.  DisneyNature’s African Cats left me…

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2014: Short Cuts with Sorrow

By: Addison Wylie We return to the Short Cuts Canada programmes to take a look at a few films that aren’t afraid to get “real”. Well, “real” in surreal surroundings and under crazy circumstances. These three shorts may be tales out of a book (certainly in the case of The Underground), but the emotion conveyed is what makes these stories come alive. They hit and miss various points, but the risks these filmmakers take are nothing…

Reviews

Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie

By: Addison Wylie Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie is fanfare to its core.  It’s also a movie that was funded by fans through a highly successful Indiegogo campaign manned by filmmakers/screenwriters Kevin Finn and the Nerd himself James Rolfe. By avid YouTube subscribers and other online viewers having such an integral role in the making of Finn and Rolfe’s film, I’m not completely surprised to see the finished product completely pander to that crowd….

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2014: Wet Noodle

By: Addison Wylie Wet Bum features a superb performance by TIFF Rising Star Julia Sarah Stone.  Her helpless presence draws us in, as if we feel the need to lend her a shoulder to cry on.  But, it’s her earnest portrayal of fourteen-year-old outsider Sam that signifies the puzzling phases of fitting in among your peers, and trying to swallow the lump in your throat when you’re singled out for being different. The film that…