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Satire

Reviews

Survival Skills

The police have always been fertile territory for mockery;  from the bumbling cop who always misses the crime to the surly “good cop” who gets shot two days before retirement.  In the last decade, however, that mockery has become problematized in and of itself, whether by people who think that the police should be above reproach or people who think that making light of the police normalizes their brutality.  As such, police satire needs to walk a…

Reviews

Lake Michigan Monster

Lake Michigan Monster is an irreverently humorous riff on z-budget monster movies of the 1950s, complete with shoestring special effects, deliberately tacky plotlines, and unusual characters.  A bizarre product of writer/director Ryland Brickson Cole Tews, Lake Michigan Monster arrives at a time of great need for strong laughs at a brisk and breezy running time.

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Reality Queen!

Meet London Logo (Julia Faye West), an arrogant heiress who has somehow found fame for being present.  At one time, her elegance was popular.  But now, she clings on to any shred of attention by releasing music, an autobiography, and rebooting an on-air partnership with partygoer Rochelle Ritzy (Shelli Boone).  The pressure for relevance stems from her fear of being pushed out by trendy, big-bootied celebrity, Kristy Kim (Candace Kita).  As journalist Diana Smelt-Marlin (Kate…

Reviews

Mister America

Mister America could be the “nichiest” project ever made and, yes, I’m including Kevin Smith’s upcoming Jay and Silent Bob Reboot.  But more importantly, Mister America is the level of Trump era satire we’ve been waiting for.

Reviews

The Oath

Out of everyone in Hollywood, I least expected comedian Ike Barinholtz (The Mindy Project, Neighbours 2: Sorority Rising, Blockers) to write and direct an impassionately-charged social satire that hilariously addresses today’s disturbing political divide.

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Special Correspondents

Ricky Gervais revels in button-pushing humour, and he’s proven to transcend those same gags by stripping away the glamourous sheen from the rich and famous.  In film and television, he’s used this gusto to make satirical jabs at faith and goodwill (The Invention of Lying) as well as fluff up ignorant egos (UK’s The Office).

Reviews

Fifty Shades of Black

What happened?  I was supposed to like Fifty Shades of Black.  As someone who wasn’t afraid to stand up for Marlon Wayans’ Haunted House spoof series, Wayans’ riff on Sam Taylor-Johnson’s Fifty Shades of Grey should’ve been up my alley.  So, indeed, what happened?