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Pacific Northwest Pictures

Reviews

Modern Persuasion

I can’t comment on whether Modern Persuasion is an adequate adaptation of Jane Austen’s Persuasion because, as someone who is shamelessly not a reader, I’m unfamiliar with the original literature.  However, just as I did earlier this year with Emma, I can give the perspective of a viewer who is going into the movie cold, looking for something sweet to curl up with.  Even though it starts out strong, I’m afraid Modern Persuasion just doesn’t…

Reviews

Black Bear

By: Jessica Goddard Our own Addison Wylie mentioned I probably shouldn’t watch the trailer for Lawrence Michael Levine’s Black Bear, since it would be better to go in cold.…and boy was he right.  When I tracked down the trailer after seeing the film, I was shocked by how much it gives away.  So in that spirit, I’ll warn that this review contains what are, effectively, spoilers (though that’s not the perfect word).

Reviews

Sound of Metal

Screenwriter Darius Marder teams up yet again with filmmaker Derek Cianfrance.  Only this time, the roles are reversed with executive producer Cianfrance taking a story credit and Marder (still penning the screenplay) stepping into the director’s chair.  The finished film, Sound of Metal, is as much of a masterpiece as their last collaboration, The Place Beyond the Pines.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Kris Rey

I Used to Go Here works as a coming-of-age story, a college comedy, and a self-reflective character piece.  While the cast and crew deserve credit for how well the film pulls off this hat trick, writer/director Kris Rey is the glue holding this project together.  With her latest film, Rey continues to prove her expertise in characterization and intentionally awkward comedy, and how magic can be made when those two elements are perfectly mixed together. I recently…

Reviews

Castle in the Ground

As the world struggles under this catastrophic pandemic, it seems prudent to remind us of another epidemic currently ravaging North America: the opioid epidemic.  Consequently, Joey Klein’s timely Castle in the Ground depicts a band of young people struggling with addiction amid the trauma of their personal lives.  While dramatically powerful and compellingly acted, the film has surprisingly little to say about the structural issues surrounding addiction and mental illness.

Reviews

JT LeRoy

By: Jessica Goddard In a classic case of truth being stranger than fiction, JT LeRoy is especially interesting if you keep in mind its events notoriously did happen.  All the required overacting works, since the story is so bizarre and based on a sequence of such strange choices.