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Dramedy

Reviews

Standing Up, Falling Down

Standing Up, Falling Down is a really nice dramedy about people finding and relating to each other.  It’s funny, touching, performed well, and directed with fluency by newcomer Matt Ratner.  As far as movies go about characters leaning on comedy as a crutch to hide their true emotions, the film is the best of its kind since Judd Apatow’s Funny People.

Reviews

Space & Time

There seems to be an unhealthy trend of shooting and wrapping film productions within a short time frame (A Fall from Grace, Appiness).  But for Toronto indie Space & Time, writer/director Shawn Gerrard sees the appeal of a patient process.  Space & Time has been shot over the period of 11 months;  allowing the film to naturally capture the passage of, well, space and time.  This lends a potentially special quality to the film’s story…

Reviews

Sometimes Always Never

Sometimes Always Never sets out to be quirky, but comes out dorky.  It takes pride in its uneven nuances, gushy sentimentality, and jokes about Scrabble.  What saves the mild-mannered movie to an extent, however, is how the awkwardness is (sort of) embraced through its humour.

Reviews

Wild Rose

By: Jolie Featherstone “Three chords and the truth” – Harlan Howard’s oft-quoted definition of country music may well describe the soul of Wild Rose.  Directed by Tom Harper and written by Nicole Taylor, Wild Rose is a classic underdog tale with an endlessly watchable underdog in the form of the fiery Rose-Lynn Harlan.

Reviews

Alright Now

Jamie Adams’ Alright Now, a romantic dramedy following a rock star following a particularly brutal double breakup, boasts that it is completely improvised.  Here’s the funny thing about improvisation: you need actors who are good at it.

Reviews

Like Father

Having co-founded Hilarity for Charity with her husband, along with appearing in a handful of comedies (For a Good Time, Call…, Sausage Party), Lauren Miller Rogen flexes her filmmaking muscles in her directorial feature debut Like Father, Netflix’s latest dramedy.

Reviews

Hearts Beat Loud

There seems to be a new trend where every Summer, audiences receive a musically-savvy indie.  Two years ago, movie goers relished in Sing Street, followed by Patti Cake$ the year after.  This season, move goers will be put under a spell by Hearts Beat Loud, an effortlessly charming and heartwarming dramedy from writer/director Brett Haley (The Hero).

Reviews

Flower

Henry Winkler has a full resume, but he’ll always be known as The Fonz.  His son, television director Max Winkler, will surely continue having a fruitful career as a filmmaker after releasing his sophomore effort Flower, an audacious flick for which he’ll be remembered for.