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Dramedy

Reviews

Hearts Beat Loud

There seems to be a new trend where every Summer, audiences receive a musically-savvy indie.  Two years ago, movie goers relished in Sing Street, followed by Patti Cake$ the year after.  This season, move goers will be put under a spell by Hearts Beat Loud, an effortlessly charming and heartwarming dramedy from writer/director Brett Haley (The Hero).

Reviews

Flower

Henry Winkler has a full resume, but he’ll always be known as The Fonz.  His son, television director Max Winkler, will surely continue having a fruitful career as a filmmaker after releasing his sophomore effort Flower, an audacious flick for which he’ll be remembered for.

Reviews

Permission

Permission is dressed-up old news.  The film looks good and the cast is hip, but the lengths the film will go to explore provocative themes within a relationship are much more common than the film believes.

Reviews

Suck It Up

Audiences were recently subjected to a tasteless dark comedy about understanding death called Considering Love & Other Magic.  Thankfully, movie goers can rebound with Suck It Up, another Canadian indie about comprehending grief that actually sticks its landing thanks to fantastic performances and Jordan Canning’s thoughtful direction.

Reviews

The Big Sick

Kumail Nanjiani (played by funnyman Kumail Nanjiani) is a Pakistani-American comedian who meets and falls in love with Emily (Zoe Kazan), a graduate student.  Their relationship is already threatened by Kumail’s parents’ insistence that he marry a woman from a Pakistani family, when Emily becomes seriously ill.  Written by Nanjiani (usually known for his co-star work in Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, Life as we Know It, and IFC’s Portlandia) and the actor’s wife Emily V. Gordon, The…

Reviews

Win It All

Life can fluctuate, and I believe that’s the point Win It All is trying to make.  Then again, filmmaker Joe Swanberg may have just set out to make a straightforward character study, in which case that works too.

Reviews

Ovum

In Ovum, the audience is quickly introduced to the wonderfully named Calpurnia Dylan, an actor who is going through the motions of frustrating auditions and occasionally dealing with stuck-up filmmakers when she isn’t running late for class.