Documentary

Reviews

Paris Is Burning

Jennie Livingston’s award-winning documentary Paris Is Burning has received a 4K restoration twenty-eight years after its initial release, and it’ll screen in select theatres across Canada throughout the year.  I believe the re-release was planned in part to curate the footage, but also because the documentary is relevant as ever.

Reviews

Pavarotti

Pavarotti is a celebration of Luciano Pavarotti’s career and his achievements as a legendary opera singer and performer.  Ron Howard’s documentary is jovial, just as Pavarotti was known to be.  As someone who had limited knowledge of the timeless tenor, I walked away from Howard’s enlightening documentary with a new appreciation for music.

Reviews

Framing John DeLorean

By: Trevor Chartrand Framing John DeLorean is a unique documentary about the man behind one of most iconic car designs in automobile history.  Much like John DeLorean himself, the film takes some big risks with an interesting and flashy approach.  Many of DeLorean’s risks did not pay off, and the same can be said for some things in this film.

Reviews

Meeting Gorbachev

I don’t take umbrage with why Werner Herzog and André Singer made a documentary about former Soviet Union president Mikhail Gorbachev.  Considering how elated both filmmakers are when they’re on screen with Gorbachev, the audience can see how much interest they have in this passion project.  However, I feel that their starstruck smokescreen stunted this project from resembling a movie worth watching.

Reviews

I’m Going to Break Your Heart

By: Trevor Chartrand I’m Going to Break Your Heart is an observational documentary that explores the relationship between Canadian indie-rock legend Raine Maida and his Juno-Award winning wife Chantal Kreviazuk as they collaborate on their first album together.  The couple struggles as all couples do, with the added challenges and frustrations of working together to create art as a team.

Reviews

Ask Dr. Ruth

Ryan White’s The Case Against 8, while very good, was a straightforward example of the documentary genre’s expectations – the film explained a controversial issue, gave a platform to those opposing it, and gave viewers an uplifting feeling about an encouraging future.  White’s latest doc Ask Dr. Ruth, while also very good, is different.  It presents facts in a way that’s much more personable.