Reviews

Reviews

Eighth Grade

By: Jessica Goddard A film as heartbreaking as it is necessary, Bo Burnham’s feature directorial debut Eighth Grade earnestly tackles the varied intricacies of growing up in the age of smartphones, YouTube, Snapchat, and Instagram.

Reviews

Broken Star

The central character in Dave Schwep’s Broken Star is a young actress fallen from grace: a drug-addicted, manipulative monster.  Markey Marlowe (Crazy, Stupid, Love’s Analeigh Tipton) – a character and name that sounds like it’s come right out of a 1940s film noir – is placed on house arrest, with her only company being reclusive landlord Daryl (Tyler Labine of Mountain Men), whose grandmother has recently passed away.  Over time, Marlowe manipulates Daryl into attacking those…

Reviews

Filmworker

Stanley Kubrick was a peculiar anomaly.  He was a world famous filmmaker with a classic catalogue, yet he lived an elusive life.  Allegedly, it was rare to be granted access into Kubrick’s personal life, and it was more rare to find someone who would be willing to put themselves that close to him considering Kubrick’s infamous reputation.

Reviews

7 Splinters in Time

7 Splinters in Time advances from a well-timed reveal.  It’s a wordy spiel of exposition delivered by the dependable and always admirable character actor Austin Pendleton, but it’s a scene that justifies the film’s frenetic style and narrative;  turning incomprehensible details into awesome creativity.

Reviews

Whitney

By: Jessica Goddard A film that could’ve been a standard biographical piece turns unexpectedly investigative in Whitney, a new documentary from Kevin Macdonald (Touching the Void, Life in a Day) about the life and legend of superstar Whitney Houston.  This is the first and only Whitney Houston documentary to be authorized by the family, and their participation and exclusive footage adds credibility.

Reviews

The King

Eugene Jarecki takes to the road in Elvis Presley’s 1963 Rolls Royce in The King.  The documentary’s narrative itself is like Jarecki’s luggage – crammed-full and seeping out of the zippers.  However, this stuffed film is interesting in ways thought-provoking open discussions can be.

Reviews

Sorry to Bother You

By: Trevor Chartrand Boots Riley’s directorial debut is undoubtedly a memorable satiric comedy, despite being uneven in some places.  Sorry to Bother You is a tad ambitious – with plenty of high-concept ideas crammed into its runtime, the overall pacing and consistency of the film suffers a bit as a result.  But then again, it’s nice to see a film with too much to say, rather than something so vapid that it says nothing.