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Festival Coverage

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘Prey’ and ‘Robbery’

Prey (DIR. Dick Mass) Sometimes viewers are given the rare pleasure of experiencing a film that, by all intents and purposes, should be awful.  Whether because of its genre’s history or just a general sense of ridiculousness, these films need to be dead on arrival, but sometimes a film is way better than it has any right to be.  Dick Mass’ Prey, a film about a giant man-eating lion causing carnage in the streets of Amsterdam,…

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘Prospect’ and ‘The Ranger’

Prospect (DIR. Chris Caldwell, Zeek Earl) First, we lived through “mumblecore”.  Then, we were subjected to “mumblegore”.  Now, it seems like the next logical step is to “mumblego” where no man has gone before.  Case in point: Chris Caldwell and Zeek Earl’s exercise in furious navel-gazing, Prospect, a film so enamored by its own cleverness that it manages to make its modest runtime seem endless.  A film whose total lack of direction in favour of world-building…

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘I’ll Take Your Dead’ and ‘Mega Time Squad’

I’ll Take Your Dead (DIR. Chad Archibald) The multi-hyphen horror film is just a concept that is here to stay.  Despite everything being a hyphenated genre lately, very few films actually know how to do it well.  The issue is that these films are often so lost in their own muddled genres, that they forget to specialize in one.  Very rarely can someone pull off an actually balanced hyphenated genre film, leading to practical magic when…

Festival Coverage

Toronto After Dark 2018: ‘The Inhabitant’ and ‘Tigers Are Not Afraid’

The Inhabitant (DIR. Guillermo Amoedo) Latin American cinema is in the middle of a great resurgence, creating some of the best works since the cinemas of poverty of the 1960s.  On another hand, there has been an influx of supernatural home invasion films: thieves having to deal with demons who won’t let them leave, a torrent which deemed any new arrivals in the genre mundane.  Using this dichotomy, one is left to wonder what the…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes @ Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival ’18

The Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a variety of well-realized works, made by young filmmakers worth keeping watch for.  The festival’s whopping total of 47 films are split into four programmes – the kids presentation Sparks (screening on September 21), followed by Forging Our Own Discourse, Moving Forward, and Searching For Belonging (screening, in order, on September 22).

Festival Coverage

TIFF 2018: ‘What is Democracy?’

At a time where democracy is in danger of losing its way, it is necessary to ask a few questions regarding the next steps towards putting democracy back on the right path, and whether democracy is even a system worth saving.  Astra Taylor’s NFB-produced What is Democracy? attempts that feat but, unfortunately, comes up short.