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Festival Coverage

Festival Coverage

Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival ’14: The Shorts

By: Addison Wylie Before another year of moviegoing goes into full swing, TIFF respectively collects a list of features and short films that astounded audiences and erupted conversation within the past year. TIFF’s annual Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival began on January 2 with Sturla Gunnarsson’s documentary Monsoon, and continues with other Canadian favourites such as Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Susan Avingaq’s doc Sol, as well as Xavier Dolan’s Mommy, which sparked buzz after the Québécois filmmaker won…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Domestic Blood & Kingdom Come

Domestic Blood (DIR. Alexis Korotash) By: Addison Wylie A young woman awakens her passive boyfriend by reminding him of her blood-sucking roots in Domestic Blood, a clever take on relationships and moody vampires.  Korotash wrote the funny screenplay, and has directed herself and Warren Short in this story about a late night confession. Short finds Korotash on the floor next to the toilet and covered in blood.  This leads to a heart-to-heart which then forms into…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Uncommon Enemies & Ejecta

Uncommon Enemies (DIR. Alex Hatz) By: Addison Wylie A late-night rendezvous between a Nazi (played by James Gangl) and a seductive mademoiselle (played by Melanie Scrofano) is interrupted by a couple of American soldiers.  When discovered, the Sergeant (played by Flashpoint’s Michael Cram) and the Nazi hold each other at gunpoint, while the French miss tends to the wounded Private (played by AJ Vaage). Uncommon Enemies is a comedic period piece that tries too hard…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Queen of Blood

Queen of Blood (DIR. Chris Alexander) By: Addison Wylie Two years ago, Fangoria’s editor-in-chief Chris Alexander rocked the Blood in the Snow Film Festival with his filmmaking debut Blood For Irina.  He called it an “experience” and said the best way to view the film is by locking yourself in with it.  He was absolutely right.  His atmospheric silent film was a masterpiece and a sensory whirlwind; utilizing ominous music and smouldering cinematography to pull the movie goer…

Festival Coverage

Blood in the Snow ’14: Serpent’s Lullaby & Berkshire County

As movie goers prepare for the season’s holiday offerings, horror fans buckle up for a round of Canadian talent at this year’s Blood in the Snow Film Festival. The festival, founded by Kelly Michael Stewart, features the cream of the genre crop.  Blood in the Snow’s selections range from unsettling slow burns to the visually grotesque.  It’s a competently passionate showcase that gives indie filmmakers a fantastic opportunity to premiere their work, and hands audiences a rare…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: Wyrmwood and Foxed!

By: Addison Wylie Wyrmwood charges through our senses.  It’s easily the scariest, most effective zombie flick audiences will have seen as of late. Kiah Roache-Turner uses a dangerous form of filmmaking that is rarely seen in modern cinema.  Mostly due to the fact that it’s an insane style that could go belly-up if the audience isn’t ready for its shocking invasiveness. Roache-Turner throws movie goers in the centre of the intense life-or-death face-offs.  He positions…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: Refuge

By: Addison Wylie A dangerous plague has wiped out most of humanity within wide proximity of Refuge’s main family.  The secluded family has stowed themselves away in their crumbling abode as life around them breaks down and dawns a bleak future. Refuge isn’t a film where the infected are on the hunt for the living.  Andrew Robertson’s slow burn is a study of survival as the human race turns on each other.  Unkempt gangs roam…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: ABCs of Death 2

By: Addison Wylie With recent horror anthologies, it seems as though the first instalment serves as an extreme experimental period.  There’s a foreboding feeling of failure when making a project that draws in different visions from all over a filmmaking pallet, but horror nuts who are true to their craft will let their audacious attitudes plow through anything resembling an obstacle. This was a clear example for the V/H/S series – an easy comparison to…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: Time Lapse

By: Addison Wylie The manipulation of time can lend itself to enticing stories and conflicted characters.  Time Lapse would’ve delivered on both of those, but filmmaker Bradley King’s melodramatic presentation robs the audience of anything intriguing. Time Lapse wisely keeps its narrative between three leads.  Those roles are filled out by Matt O’Leary, Danielle Panabaker, and George Finn who all appear and act as if their characters should be a few years older.  Those close-knit…

Festival Coverage

Wylie Writes at Toronto After Dark ’14: Wolves

By: Addison Wylie It’s funny to see Entertainment One attached to Wolves.  It almost acts as an apology to werewolf fanatics who may have been bothered by the studio’s Twilight series. Even though Wolves wipes our memories of Taylor Lautner and his chiseled abs sprinting through the woods, David Hayter’s toothy flick isn’t anything too special.  It’s a serviceable film with pop-up gems. Cayden is at that usual stage a young man hits in his…