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About Addison Wylie

Addison Wylie is a Toronto based film critic best known for his honest, no nonsense reviews of current mainstream films and his coverage of Toronto based  film festivals and events. He started his career in high school where he wrote, acted in, directed and produced short films for The A.Wylie Society on Facebook and Youtube. He then went on to get an education in television broadcasting and video production. After receiving his college diploma, Addison…

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Kris Rey

I Used to Go Here works as a coming-of-age story, a college comedy, and a self-reflective character piece.  While the cast and crew deserve credit for how well the film pulls off this hat trick, writer/director Kris Rey is the glue holding this project together.  With her latest film, Rey continues to prove her expertise in characterization and intentionally awkward comedy, and how magic can be made when those two elements are perfectly mixed together. I recently…

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ Two-On-One with Samuel Gonzalez Jr. and Arturo Castro

Directed and co-written by veteran Samuel Gonzalez Jr., Battle Scars confronts the long-term effects of war through acts of of desperation by a disoriented young soldier learning how to piece his life back together.  During the film’s festival run, it picked up awards at the San Diego International Film Festival (Best Military Film), the Orland Film Festival (Best Screenplay), and the Cinema on the Bayou Film Festival (Best Feature).

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Kire Paputts

Director Kire Paputts follows up his modest feature debut The Rainbow Kid with The Last Porno Show, an envelope-pushing character drama chronicling the personal arc of an aspiring actor taking over his estranged father’s faded adults-only move theatre.  It’s a really good movie that doesn’t shy away from anything and bares it all.  It stuck to me like shoes to the floor of a sold-out screening room.

One-on-Ones

Wylie Writes’ One-On-One with Eve Harlow

A movie is made up of many moving parts, as you know, but The Tomorrow Man really makes you appreciate its supporting characters.  John Lithgow and Blythe Danner (as Ed and Ronnie) are terrific actors who have no problem holding our attention and steering the story (provided by writer/director Noble Jones).  But, their characters would have a hard time finding momentum if it wasn’t for Ed’s temperamental family – a group of people we’re briefly involved…