July 2018

Reviews

7 Splinters in Time

7 Splinters in Time advances from a well-timed reveal.  It’s a wordy spiel of exposition delivered by the dependable and always admirable character actor Austin Pendleton, but it’s a scene that justifies the film’s frenetic style and narrative;  turning incomprehensible details into awesome creativity.

Reviews

Whitney

By: Jessica Goddard A film that could’ve been a standard biographical piece turns unexpectedly investigative in Whitney, a new documentary from Kevin Macdonald (Touching the Void, Life in a Day) about the life and legend of superstar Whitney Houston.  This is the first and only Whitney Houston documentary to be authorized by the family, and their participation and exclusive footage adds credibility.

Reviews

The King

Eugene Jarecki takes to the road in Elvis Presley’s 1963 Rolls Royce in The King.  The documentary’s narrative itself is like Jarecki’s luggage – crammed-full and seeping out of the zippers.  However, this stuffed film is interesting in ways thought-provoking open discussions can be.

Reviews

Sorry to Bother You

By: Trevor Chartrand Boots Riley’s directorial debut is undoubtedly a memorable satiric comedy, despite being uneven in some places.  Sorry to Bother You is a tad ambitious – with plenty of high-concept ideas crammed into its runtime, the overall pacing and consistency of the film suffers a bit as a result.  But then again, it’s nice to see a film with too much to say, rather than something so vapid that it says nothing.

Reviews

Muse: Drones World Tour

By: Graeme Howard When a live concert film is done right, it can create a viewing experience that is wholly unique to the live counterpart. Muse: Drones World Tour is an exciting live concert experience on the big screen, providing a non-stop hour-and-a-half of music and sensory overload.  That being said, there are a few minor criticisms that hold this live concert experience from a wider appeal to the masses as opposed to being just fan…

Reviews

The Oslo Diaries

By: Jessica Goddard A well-paced timeline of the 1990s peace negotiations in the Middle East, The Oslo Diaries skillfully articulates the sense of both hope and skepticism in the period.  Directed by Mor Loushy and Daniel Sivan, the filmmakers use diary excerpts, historical footage, news clips, and participant commentary to paint a picture of simultaneous optimism and doubt surrounding the Oslo Accords.